Derrick Williams tweeted that he felt like a "caged lion" as a rookie. Now he probably feels like a minnow.

Apparently, he's become trade bait.

The Timberwolves reportedly attempted to move Williams, the No. 2 overall pick last season. If so, that shows a remarkable lack of patience, even in our 140-character society. Williams -- heck, any player, for that matter -- deserves more time to develop and realize his true potential.

Williams turned 21 last month and has played one lockout-shortened NBA season with a minimal training camp. They can't possibly know what he'll look like as a finished product.

Besides, what's the rush? Do the Wolves actually believe they're that close to contending for something?

The Wolves are determined to reshape their roster this summer after showing renewed signs of life as an organization last season before Ricky Rubio's knee injury. Michael Beasley, Anthony Randolph and Martell Webster likely are on the way out. Wes Johnson should be, too, although good luck finding a taker on him.

Those personnel moves make sense. Trading Williams after one season makes sense only in a narrow view that seems to be dictating this offseason makeover. The reasons cited for dangling Williams in trade talks project an urgency that anticipates a deep playoff run in the next few seasons.

Rick Adelman is 66 and wants one more bite at the playoff apple before retirement. Wolves President David Kahn needs to win for the sake of self-preservation. And Glen Taylor is hoping to sell the team in the next few years. Those factors run counter to the notion of building long-term around a nucleus of young, talented players.