"How does Steve Nash help them stop Russell Westbrook or Tony Parker?'

That's the standard reaction from skeptics to the Lakers' addition of Steve Nash. Sure, Nash can dish at an obscenely high rate even as 40 comes screaming at him like a bald eagle ready to pounce on him with a good ol' American mid-life crisis on his Canadian head. Sure, he can still shoot at an efficiency that makes the assembly line look like two dudes with hammers whacking away at sheet metal. But Nash has never been a good defender. People with full understanding know that it's in large part because he has a degenerative back condition that forces him to lay down every time he goes to the bench and that the fact he's able to move laterally at all is a miracle. But it doesn't change anything. Nash isn't going to make the Lakers' point guard defense, which was shredded against OKC in the Western Conference Finals and in the regular season against San Antonio.

Here's the problem with that line of reasoning.

We've reached critical mass with point guard offensive talent in the NBA. Versus every other position in the league, point guard is no longer determined by "who can you line up to beat the other guy across the lineup sheet from you" and has gone simply to "who's the guy that can do the most damage for your side?"