Theo Epstein exclaimed, “If not now, when?”, and the mindset/motto for last year’s trade deadline was formed.

The Cubs’ president of baseball operations was explaining why he gave up an elite prospect, Gleyber Torres, to land Aroldis Chapman from the Yankees. An Indians executive could have offered the same sentiment in explaining all they surrendered for Andrew Miller.

Of course, Brian Cashman could have stated the same, in the opposite direction, in trading Chapman and Miller – “if not know, when” to seize the best opportunity for a renovation? I wonder if this is setting us up for this July’s main explanation for major moves: “If the Yankees can be sellers, why can’t we?”

In the last betting lines offered by Bovada before the season, the top seven over-under win totals belonged to the Cubs, Dodgers, Red Sox, Indians, Nationals, Astros and Mets.

The next five were the Giants, Mariners, Cardinals, Rangers and Blue Jays – between 84.5 and 87.5 wins. Going into Thursday, those teams had five of the majors’ worst nine records. Yes, it is still early, enough time for a few of those teams to reverse toward expected contention (Seattle, for example, won five of six after a 2-8 start). But all five? That seems unlikely when each already has demonstrated shortcomings that are not easily fixed.

I think all, if motivated to sell, would behave like the Yankees – deal in the short term to improve the long term, but without going into a total rebuild. But think about what their presence could mean to the trade deadline marketplace:

1. Giants

Their history is to go for it (but so was the Yankees’). They have an older roster, a tepid farm system, the Dodgers looking like an NL West monster for years to come and the Rockies and Diamondbacks possibly being factors as early as this season. Their most intriguing trade piece would be Johnny Cueto, who is in season two of a six-year, $130 million contract, but who can opt out after this season.

There is risk that a team acquires Cueto and he doesn’t opt out — then either declines or gets injured. Or, perhaps, there are teams that hope Cueto would stay instead of wading into the free-agent market. How would the Giants even know how to properly assess value for a player who can stay or opt out? Might the Giants consider dealing Matt Moore or Jeff Samardzija instead?