Possible plea agreements.

Lawyers for Alex Rodriguez, now aware of the extent of Major League Baseball’s case against the Yankee third baseman and in a possible attempt to cut their client’s potentially massive losses, are engaging in internal discussions about brokering a plea deal with MLB to reduce A-Rod’s looming drug suspension, three sources familiar with baseball’s investigation into Anthony Bosch and the Biogenesis performance-enhancing drug scandal have told the Daily News.

According to the sources, a 150-game suspension might be the best that could be expected for Rodriguez, who is rehabbing from hip surgery with high Single-A Tampa and was chastised by the Yankees Saturday for failing to report to the team’s complex for Friday night’s game following a four-and-a-half hour meeting with MLB officials who outlined their case against him. His 20-day rehab assignment ends on July 22, and it is unclear where A-Rod will go after that, but according to a source, Yankee officials sent him a notification Saturday telling him that he is obligated to inform them in advance of any absence. Rodriguez also declined to accept an assignment to Buffalo, where the Yankees wanted him to join their Triple-A team, the Scranton/Wilkes-Barre Yankees, saying he was having a problem with his quad muscle. Rodriguez played in Saturday night’s game in Tampa, however.

According to another source, Rodriguez’s meeting with MLB ended at about 4 p.m., and a clearly shaken Rodriguez then met with MLB Players Association reps for an hour and a half to discuss what had been outlined by MLB officials. When Rodriguez didn’t show up at the Yankee complex, GM Brian Cashman then tried to reach the three-time AL MVP, who told him that he “just couldn’t make it.”

Meanwhile, an A-Rod spokesman told The News Saturday night in reference to a possible plea deal that “nobody from Alex’s team has made any such comments, and as we have said before, we are respecting the process and following the procedures as outlined in the joint agreement."

As The News has reported, MLB is believed to have extensive evidence, including Bosch’s own testimony, that Rodriguez committed multiple violations of the joint drug agreement, including acquiring performance-enhancing drugs from Bosch for several years. The self-described “biochemist” has been cooperating with MLB for several weeks in exchange for being dropped from baseball’s lawsuit against him for tortious interference with its player contracts, indemnifying him for legal expenses and putting in a good word for him with law enforcement, and he is believed to have provided proof of his dealings with Rodriguez.