For the past week, Miami Dolphins guard Richie Incognito has been at the epicenter of a firestorm that involves racial implications, and hazing and bullying allegations from his own teammate, Jonathan Martin, who left the team on Oct. 28.

Martin's attorney, David Cornwell, released a statement Thursday that alleges that Martin endured harassment that went far beyond the traditional locker-room hazing. Cornwell also stated that, beyond the well-publicized voice mail with its racial epithet, his client “endured a malicious physical attack on him by a teammate, and daily vulgar comments. The facts are not in dispute.”

I sat down exclusively with Incognito on Saturday at the Beverly Wilshire Hotel in his first extended interview to address everything that's been reported.

Here now, the interview:

Incognito: You can ask anybody in the Miami Dolphins locker room, who had Jon Martin’s back the absolute most? And they will undoubtedly tell you, me.

Incognito: Jon never showed signs that football was getting to him, um, the locker room was getting to him.

Glazer: You’re saying you don’t know what led to this, your teammates are saying we don’t know. His side has clearly said we do know. OK, and there’s bullying involved. There was a voice message left. I’m going to read it to you. You did leave this voice message?

Incognito: Yes, I did leave this voice message.

Glazer: And it’s, 'Hey what’s up, you half N word piece of blank. I saw you on Twitter, you been training ten weeks. Want to blank in your blank mouth. I’m going to slap blank mouth. Going to slap your real mother across the face. Laughter. You’re still a rookie. I’ll kill you.' You hear that, going back to that now, do you look at that and say, 'I left that for Jonathan Martin?'

Incognito: When I see that voicemail, when I see those words come up across the screen, I’m embarrassed by it. I’m embarrassed by my actions. But what I want people to know is, the way Jonathan and the rest of the offensive line and how our teammates how we communicate, it’s vulgar. It’s, it’s not right. When the words are put in the context, I understand why a lot of eyebrows get raised, but people don’t know how Jon and I communicate to one another.

Glazer: But there’s one thing of saying that, another thing with a white man using the “N” word. How do you tell America, how do you expect anybody in America to believe you’re not a racist.

Incognito: I am not a racist. And to judge me by that one word is wrong. In no way shape or form is it ever acceptable for me to use that word even if it’s friend to friend on a voicemail. I regret that.

Glazer: How much in today’s locker room is it thrown around by African Americans and white players?

Incognito: It’s thrown around a lot. It’s a word that I’ve heard Jon use a lot. Not saying it’s right for when I did it in the voicemail, but there’s a lot of colorful words thrown around the locker room that we don’t use in everyday life. The fact of the matter remains, though, that that voicemail was left as a private voicemail for my friend, and it was a joke.