David "Deacon" Jones, the Hall of Fame defensive end whom some consider the greatest defensive player in NFL history, has died at the age of 74.

The Washington Redskins, for whom Jones played his final NFL season in 1974, posted an obituary on their website Monday night after announcing the news. Natural causes was given as the cause of Jones' death.

Jones' NFL career started in 1961, when he was selected by the Los Angeles Rams in the 14th round (186th overall) out of Mississippi Vocational (now known as Mississippi Valley State). Jones spent his first 11 seasons in Los Angeles, where he teamed with Merlin Olsen, Rosey Grier and Lamar Lundy to form "The Fearsome Foursome" -- one of the most famous defensive lines in NFL history. Jones was selected to seven consecutive Pro Bowls with the Rams from 1964 to 1970 and made eight overall.

Olsen died in March 2010 at age 69 and Lundy died in February 2007 at 71. Grier, who is 80, is the only surviving member of the Fearsome Foursome.

"A tremendously sad day for our Rams family with the passing of Deacon Jones," tweeted Kevin Demoff, executive vice president of football operations and COO for the now-St. Louis Rams. "Revered on & off the field, a legend who redefined the game."

Few would disagree with former Rams coach George Allen, who labeled Jones as the "greatest defensive end of modern football." Jones, also a two-time NFL Defensive Player of the Year, was nicknamed "Secretary of Defense" by Rams fans. Jones later was named "defensive end of the Century" by Sports Illustrated in 1999.

Jones was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1980.

Jones -- who proved to be one of the more durable players in NFL history, missing just five games during his decorated 14-year career -- was traded to the San Diego Chargers in 1972 and had immediate success, receiving defensive captain honors and a Pro Bowl selection. Jones finished his career in 1974 with the Washington Redskins.

In addition to his accomplishments on the field, the outspoken Jones is credited with coining the phrase "sacking the quarterback."