Mike Woodson said Knicks fans should preach patience as they wait for Peace.
It’s official! Metta World Peace, the former Ron Artest, was waived via the amnesty rule Thursday night by the Lakers, partially paving the way for him to finally come home and become a Knick.

A lot of chips have to fall James Dolan’s way for this Big Apple dream to happen, but World Peace’s father, Ron Artest Sr., believes ultimately it will. Though World Peace has told his father he would retire if he got amnestied by the Lakers, Artest Sr. doesn’t believe it.

“I feel it’s a big, big possibility,’’ Artest Sr. told The Post Thursday night of his son joining the Knicks. “If the Knicks go after Ron, I can’t see him turning them down.’’

The Lakers saved World Peace’s $7.7 million in salary plus luxury taxes. However, the Queensbridge product now has to clear amnesty waivers in which under-the-cap teams can put a bid on him.

Eleven teams under the cap who can block his move to the Knicks, who received another blow yesterday when the Nets signed forward Andrei Kirilenko. Michael Jordan’s Bobcats, Atlanta, Philadelphia, Detroit, Orlando, Sacramento, Dallas, Utah, Cleveland and Phoenix can now bid on World Peace in the next 48 hours.

If nobody bids on the controversial 33-year-old small forward, he becomes an outright free agent available for the veteran’s minimum of $1.4 million.

Asked at Thursday’s summer-league practice about the team’s interest if World Peace becomes available, Woodson said: “[General manager] Glen [Grunwald] is coming up and we’ll sit and talk more about him. We don’t have to rush to do anything. The core group is intact that won 54 games last year. That player, or two, could slip through the cracks with amnesty or someone waived or bought out. It can happen. We got to sit patiently and wait and keep roster spots open to see if that may happen.”

World Peace has told his father he doesn’t want to uproot his family by going to another city. He told his father he especially has no interest in playing for a non-contender. However, by retiring, World Peace would forfeit the $7.7 million. If he clears without being bid on, he becomes a free agent and can make $7.7 million plus a portion of the $1.4 million veteran’s minimum (some money is rerouted to the Lakers).

“My gut feels like if the Knicks want him now, my gut tells me it will happen,’’ said Artest Sr., who runs his own kids foundation in New York City. “I haven’t spoken to him yet tonight. I think he could be a prized possession for the Knicks. He wanted to play for the Knicks for so long, since childhood.’’