When Knicks point guard Jason Kidd looks at Ricky Rubio, he sees a younger version of himself.

"He plays both ends," Kidd said Friday morning. "He's very good at finding the open guy. And defensively he can get in the passing lanes and get steals."

In an era of shoot-first point guards, Kidd and Rubio are both pass-first players who look for an open teammate before they look for a shot. But Rubio, who went head to head with Kidd in Friday's Wolves-Knicks game at Target Center, would like to see even more similarities between the two as his career progresses.

"He's been one of the top point guards in the league, and he's been improving his shot a lot," Rubio said. "And it's something that I have to look at, because when he came to the league he couldn't shoot as well as he's doing now."

To Rubio, Kidd is proof that a better shot can be developed after an NBA career starts. Kidd, 39, came into the league in 1994 with Dallas as a guard with great vision and passing skills but without a great shot. But, with work, he turned himself into a competent shooter, especially from three-point range; Kidd ranks third all-time in the NBA in three-pointers made.