George Mitchell, the man behind and namesake of the Mitchell Report, was on Chuck Todd's show on MSNBC this morning to talk about the latest PED business out of Miami. He said something pretty sensible:

"Every society has laws against robbery and murder, yet everyone knows that robbery and murder are not going to end. It's managing an ongoing human problem. That's the case with performance-enhancing drugs. It's a problem of…keeping pace, reducing the incentives to use and…increasing vigilance, regulation and punishment for those who use."

Sensible, but unfortunately we don't treat it like that. Instead, we treat it as a scandal/parlor game in which we care more about the names of users for their own sake than we do about the underlying problem and spend far more mental effort on the former than the latter.

Of course the reason we do that is because of George Mitchell's report itself. It was the Mitchell Report which set the tone of how we discuss PEDs in baseball. It was the Mitchell Report which decided that the most interesting and important thing about steroids in baseball was who used and who didn't as opposed to how PEDs get into the game, what they mean for the game, how they damage it and how they damage the users. It did so by having as its climax a woefully incomplete naming of names — and it was the names that got all of the press — as opposed to anything approaching a real understanding of the issue. It was George Mitchell who took Jose Canseco's lead and turned PEDs into a gotcha game as opposed to using his report as a means of giving us a better understanding of PEDs and their role in baseball.