As Tuesday morning broke just minutes after a late night Red Sox win, the thought of Clay Buchholz on the mound and all the questions surrounding him coming into this game seemed far away. Are we done with the rosin questions? Have we finished counting how many times Buchholz licks his fingers or wipes his hands on his pants? Perhaps you saw his breath showing up in the cool May air, or the icicles forming on the hair that he insists on wetting each inning (that is mere jesting, but it was a chilly night). While plenty of people out there would like to keep talking about where Buchholz has gotten his magical results in recent games, something much more pressing was happening Monday night. The Red Sox were in trouble. They were coming into town having lost three in a row, showing not only a horrid offense (just four runs scored over the weekend) but also an inability to make a dent against the American League’s real power teams. 20-11 looked a lot less beautiful considering the Red Sox had done it by preying on the Royals, the Astros and the feebly flapping Blue Jays. The Red Sox have looked bad at other points this season, and each time they had bounced back. Most people probably assumed that would happen again Monday night. But as the game began to unfold, the Red Sox did the opposite — and what could have been an easy stopper instead looked like the setup for a disappointing loss. That’s what made Buccholz’s Monday night so good for the home team. The Red Sox wanted a resounding win, one where they could come out and trample the 13-14 Twins not only for a victory but also for some confidence. Instead, they encountered fighters who bit into Buchholz’s ethereal season with a fervor that few teams have been able to find against the Sox this season.