Tim Duncan swears he has never even logged on to Twitter.com.

“I’m probably the only person I know that hasn’t,” Duncan said.

The Spurs star wouldn’t know a Tweet from a twit, although he would probably agree the latter is often responsible for the former. At nearly 37, Duncan isn’t necessarily too old for social media.

Just too private.

“I have no desire to tell you guys what I’m doing,” Duncan said.

Contrast that with a certain All-Star counterpart on the Los Angeles Lakers, who spent Game 1 of his team’s Western Conference playoff series against the Spurs broadcasting his innermost thoughts for the world to read.

Laid up in Los Angeles with a ruptured Achilles tendon that will keep him out of the playoffs, Kobe Bryant still apparently had a working pair of Tweeting thumbs.

He used them to coach from his couch during the Spurs’ 91-79 series-opening victory Sunday, a development that at times threatened to overshadow the game itself.

A sample Tweet from @kobebryant: “What I would say if I was there right now? ‘Pau (Gasol), get ur ass on the block and don’t move till u get it.’”

Leave it to Bryant to insert himself into a playoff series, even from 1,350 miles away.

“It’s great to have that commentary,” Lakers coach Mike D’Antoni said after the game, literally rolling his eyes.

Later, D’Antoni downplayed Bryant’s Twitterstorm as the unfiltered observations of “a fan” who “gets excited.”

“On to game 2,” Bryant later Tweeted to his more than 2.2 million followers. “I will be watching from the crib again in a pau jersey and laker face paint ha!”

Perhaps sensing himself becoming a distraction, Bryant took to the popular social media platform again Monday, taking a vow of Twitter silence for the remainder of the series.

“Focus should be on the team not my insight,” Bryant posted.

With Wednesday’s Game 2 still two days away, however, Bryant’s running commentary of Game 1 remained a hot topic as both teams returned to the practice floor Monday. Duncan, of course, did not see any of Bryant’s Tweets. Spurs point guard Tony Parker, who is on Twitter, didn’t either.

“I was playing,” Parker said. “I didn’t know what he said.”

Manu Ginobili, perhaps the Spurs’ most avid consumer of social media, said he too was oblivious to the Tweeting Mamba’s string of 140-characters-or-less masterworks. But he could understand Bryant’s impulse to post them. Ginobili said he considered live Tweeting a game during his recent nine-game stint on the injured list, as a novel way to connect with fans.