On the first day of Browns minicamp Tuesday, first-rounder Barkevious Mingo crashed in and batted down a Jason Campbell ball at the line of scrimmage. On the second day, he floated back and deflected a Brian Hoyer pass that was then intercepted.

In his new spot at outside linebacker, the former LSU defensive end is already wreaking plenty of havoc. But the Browns aren’t going to hand him a starting job just because he was the No. 6 overall pick.

He’s currently toiling on the second team at right outside linebacker behind third-year pro Jabaal Sheard, who has had 15½ sacks the past two seasons. Starting on the opposite side is Paul Kruger, the former Baltimore Raven who broke out last season with nine sacks and 4½ more in the playoffs.

Instead of the glass ceiling, Mingo has a wall of muscle to break through in his bid for a starting job — a combined 525 pounds of flesh in Kruger and Sheard.

“Right now, the other two guys are better,” said outside linebackers coach Brian Baker, who has coached some of the best pass rushers in the NFL, including Julius Peppers when he made the Pro Bowl in Carolina. “So, yeah, whether I’m supposed to say it or not.”

“Every place I’ve been, I’ve always played the best guys and played those guys in the best positions. So if Barkevious beats one of those guys out, he’ll be a starter. Until then, they’re the starters.”

Mingo, who had 23½ sacks in his past two seasons, has every intention of starting the opener against Miami on Sept. 8.

“I’m very determined,” Mingo said. “That’s the goal. That should be everybody’s goal. You want to play, you want to help the team win, but you’ve got to put in the work.”

He has already seen firsthand just how tough it will be to crack the top two during the next three months.

“Exactly,” he said. “Those are some big-time guys. It’s a learning curve. I’ve been thrown into a different position. Time will tell what the coaches think.”

But Mingo would rather earn the job than inherit it due to his first-round pedigree.

“You don’t want anything given to you,” he said. “So you earn the respect and put in the work to get what you want.”