First, e-pulltabs virtually collapsed as a revenue source for the state’s share of the new Vikings stadium.

Now the sports memorabilia tax, once thought to be a fallback plan, may also be doomed.

With only six days left in the legislative session, Senate leaders on Tuesday declared the idea of taxing sports memorabilia nearly dead, because of the effect it might have on a single corporation: Target.

Senate Taxes Committee Chairman Rod Skoe, DFL-Clearwater, said Tuesday that because the tax would be levied at the wholesale level, it would have a disparate impact on Target, which warehouses the sports memorabilia for its more than 1,700 U.S. stores in Minnesota.

Target Corp. officials did not return calls seeking comment.

House Taxes Committee Chairwoman Ann Lenczewski, DFL-Bloomington, is prepared to fight hard for the memorabilia tax.

“It is a workable tax,” she said, and short of getting Vikings owners to cough up more, a reasonable option. “I think the memorabilia tax is the way to go and I’m going to convince them,” she said.

Split among DFLers

That opens the newest crack among a DFL House, DFL Senate and DFL governor who, despite having struck an overall deal Sunday, have yet to resolve a number of details, including a roughly $25 million to $30 million annual gap in the state’s share of stadium financing.

The uncertainty comes a week after Gov. Mark Dayton demanded a new solution to the disappointing revenue from electronic charitable gambling. At that time, he and other leaders hinted broadly that they might have a plan. But details have been absent since then.

“We’re hearing there’s this supersecret plan to fund the shortfall in the Vikings stadium. The governor hasn’t said what it is,” said Sen. Julianne Ortman, R-Chanhassen, the ranking minority member on the Taxes Committee. “We don’t know what their plans are. It seems, six days out, they would have a better framework at least for the close of session here.”