On the same day that ESPN aired video of Rutgers men’s coach Mike Rice shoving his players and throwing basketballs at them during practice, Timberwolves coach Rick Adelman held a wide-ranging conversation Tuesday about his career and methods with reporters now that he is only two victories away from 1,000 NBA victories.

Part of the conversation included why he is a coach of relatively few words and how few of those few words have ever been screamed in anger.

“I had a temper, too, but I didn’t like to be coached like that,” said Adelman, who played college ball at Loyola Marymount in Los Angeles and in the NBA from 1968-75. “I didn’t like the intimidation factor that coaches had. You can teach and you correct and you can find a way to get through to a guy without having to do that. Everybody has their own way.

“I didn’t like it, and I wasn’t going to do that. And if I did raise my voice or get upset, they remembered it a lot more than if you did it all the time. That’s one thing I did learn. That’s why I give my assistants a lot of leeway because I want them [players] to hear different voices.”

Adelman said he always has considered basketball “a game of mistakes” and the team or player who makes the fewest wins.

“If I made a mistake, did you really have to tell me?” Adelman asked. “If I did something wrong on the court, I pretty much knew it right off the bat and I knew I was going to be talked to by the coach, but I didn’t like the intimidation factor. … I just didn’t care for it. I didn’t think it was necessary.”