The NBA is pushing toward changes to the draft lottery system by next season but is facing a strong objection from the Philadelphia 76ers, the franchise that could suffer the most from it, multiple sources told ESPN.com.

Earlier this month at league meetings in Las Vegas, lottery reform measures were introduced and changes could be voted into place by the NBA Board of Governors at their preseason meeting in October. Though there are several facets and the proposals haven't been finalized, essentially the goal of commissioner Adam Silver is to balance out the lottery odds so the worst team or teams wouldn't have the highest chances of landing the top pick, sources said.

Currently, the team with the worst record has a 25 percent chance of getting the top pick and the team with the fifth-worst record has an 8.8 percent chance of winning it. In a new format, this could be altered so the bottom five or six teams all would have an equal chance.

Though the NBA likely will not frame it this way, these considered changes could be seen as an anti-tanking measure, as teams with the worst records may not earn significantly higher lottery odds.

The rough draft of this plan was met with opposition by 76ers management, who are in the midst of a multiseason rebuilding project that is depending on a high pick next year. The 76ers, sources said, are hoping to get the NBA to delay plans for at least a year because it acts as a de facto punishment while just playing by the rules that have been in place.